Reforming Health Care

November 13th, 2009

Less than a year since Barack Obama took office as president, but the battle over how to reform our employed-based-insurance health care system has been going on for a half-century. President Obama has made it his top priority to win this battle. Last weekend the House of Representatives passed the most far reaching health care reform bill in a generation, but it seems impossible to cut through the media clutter and see what the legislation is really about. So this week on Business Matters, we are delving into the subject of health care to help you understand what the proposed reform could mean to you and what it would really take to fix our broken system.

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[audio:http://businessmatters.net/episodes/healthcare/bm-091113.mp3]

Business Matters News & Michael Mandel, Senior Economist @BusinessWeek
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[audio:http://businessmatters.net/episodes/healthcare/bm-091113a.mp3]

michael-mandel_web Michael Mandel is chief economist at BusinessWeek, responsible for formulating BusinessWeek’s coverage of economic policy. Prior to this, Mandel was economics editor. Mandel is the author of several books, including “Rational Exuberance”, “The Coming Internet Depression”, and “The High Risk Society”. He writes the World Economy Blog for BusinessWeek.

Health Care Reform Update: Trudy Lieberman, Contributing Editor @CJR
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Veteran reporter Trudy Lieberman is the president of the Association of Health Journalists, a nonprofit group dedicated to helping the public understand health care issues. She’s also director of the health and medicine reporting program at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. For 29 years she covered economic, health policy, and health financing issues at Consumer Reports, and she’s a contributing editor to the Columbia Journalism Review.

Health Care IT: Dr. Blackford Middleton, Prof. of Medicine
&
John Burklow, Associate Director @NIH Office of Communications & Public Liaison

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Blackford Middleton is Corporate Director of Clinical Informatics Research & Development (CIRD), and Chairman of the Center for Information Technology Leadership (CITL) at Partners Healthcare System, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health.

John Burklow is the associate director for communications and public liaison at the National john-burklow-50x80Institutes of Health (NIH), the primary medical research agency in the Federal government. NIH’s annual budget is more than $29 billion, which supports a large research facility in Bethesda, Md., and more than 325,000 researchers throughout the United States and around the world. Burklow oversees the news media, editorial operations, online communications, special projects and NIH visitor center functions.

The Mutant Market of Health Care: David Goldhill, Author “How American Health Care Killed My Father” & CEO
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[audio:http://businessmatters.net/episodes/healthcare/bm-091113d.mp3]user_ramy_4a247f05b

It’s hard enough to lose someone to illness, but when that death could have been prevented, it makes it all the more difficult.  After losing his father to a hospital-borne infection two years ago, David Goldhill was drawn into trying to understand what makes the health care industry so unlike any other in our country.  His article, How American Health Care Killed My Father, telling his story and proposing some reforms to bring more sanity into the labrynthine system appeared in the September issue of the Atlantic Magazine.

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